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gsvaughan
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The Great Champagne District, 1920 09/30/2013 11:30:42
    

Map of Champagne District 1920 Excerpted from "The Champagne Vine Country and Champagne Wine", 1920, by Georges Chappaz and Alexandre Henriot. This is a somewhat simplistic but still pleasant introduction to the towns within that famous region of France, and to the basic grape varieties grown there. Here's a link to the original document at archive.org. The best part of the Champagne vine-country lies some hundred miles to the east of Paris, in the districts of Reims, Epernay and Chalons. The vines grow on slopes, of which the northern boundary is the Reims mountain and the southern limit is the Brie country. The river Marne, celebrated by its victories, forms the central valley. Magnificent forests crown these slopes, and the undulating vineyards with their woodland background afford many picturesque features, with extensive views over ,he surrounding country. The peculiar character of the soil is one of the chief causes of the remarkable quality of the wine. The trade in Champagne wines is an extremely ancient one; its principal centres are Reims, Epernay and Ay, but Chalons-sur-Marne and other place such as Mareuil, Avize and Vertus, are also the homes of well known firms. The whole region of the vineyards is well worth a visit, and the roads are excellent for motoring. Several railway lines running between Paris and Reims, Paris-Epernay-Chalons, and Epernay-Ay-Reims, make it possible to travel from Paris and back the same day. On the slopes of the Mountain of Reims...
The Great Champagne District, 1920 09/30/2013 11:21:15
    

Map of Champagne District 1920 Excerpted from "The Champagne Vine Country and Champagne Wine", 1920, by Georges Chappaz and Alexandre Henriot. This is a somewhat simplistic but still pleasant introduction to the towns within that famous region of France, and to the basic grape varieties grown there. Here's a link to the original document at archive.org. The best part of the Champagne vine-country lies some hundred miles to the east of Paris, in the districts of Reims, Epernay and Chalons. The vines grow on slopes, of which the northern boundary is the Reims mountain and the southern limit is the Brie country. The river Marne, celebrated by its victories, forms the central valley. Magnificent forests crown these slopes, and the undulating vineyards with their woodland background afford many picturesque features, with extensive views over ,he surrounding country. The peculiar character of the soil is one of the chief causes of the remarkable quality of the wine. The trade in Champagne wines is an extremely ancient one; its principal centres are Reims, Epernay and Ay, but Chalons-sur-Marne and other place such as Mareuil, Avize and Vertus, are also the homes of well known firms. The whole region of the vineyards is well worth a visit, and the roads are excellent for motoring. Several railway lines running between Paris and Reims, Paris-Epernay-Chalons, and Epernay-Ay-Reims, make it possible to travel from Paris and back the same day. On the slopes of the Mountain of Reims...
The Iron: A Golfer's Favorite Club 09/14/2013 20:32:15
    

W hen I mention that useful iron-headed club that goes by the simple name of iron, I am conscious that I bring forward a subject that is dear to the hearts of many golfers who have not yet come to play with certainty with all their instruments. For the iron is often the golfer's favourite club, and it has won this place of affection in his mind because it has been found in the course of long experience that it plays him fewer tricks than any of the others—that it is more dependable. This may be to some extent because with the average golfer such fine work is seldom required from the simple iron as is wanted from other clubs from time to time. The distance to be covered is always well within the capabilities of the club, or it would not be employed, and the average golfer of whom we speak, who has still a handicap of several strokes, is usually tolerably well satisfied if with it he places the ball anywhere on the green, from which point he will be enabled to hole out in the additional regulation two strokes. And the green is often enough a large place, so the iron is fortunate in its task. But it goes without saying that by those who have the skill for it, and sufficiently realise the possibilities of all their tools, some of the finest work in golf may be done with the iron. When it is called for the player is within easy reach of the hole. The really long work has been accomplished, and the prime consideration now is that of accuracy. Therefore the man who fe...


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