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This ring is dedicated to the Native Americans of all nations. If you relate in any way to the Native ways, have a Native American homepage or site please join in our ring of Peace, Love, and Harmony. This is just another forum for uniting and sharing with the world our views, teachings, religions, and spirituality.
 

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Historic Accounts of Iroquois Indian Villages and Long Houses - 02/01/2013
Historic Accounts of Iroquois Indian Villages and Long Houses During the greater part of the year the Iroquois resided in villages. The size of the village was estimated by the number of the houses, and the size of the house by the number of fires it contained. One of the largest of the Seneca-Iroquois villages, situated at Mendon, near Rochester, N. Y. is thus described by Mr. Greenbalgh, who visited it in 1677: "Tiotohatton is on the brink or edge of a hill, has not much cleared ground, is near the river Tiotohatton , which signifies bending. It lies to the westward of Canagora (Canandaigua) about thirty miles, contains about 120 houses, being the largest of all the houses we saw, the ordinary being fifty to sixty feet long, with twelve and thirteen fires in one house. They have a good store of corn growing to the northward of the town". The "long-house" of the Iroquois, from which they called themselves, as one confederated people, Ho-de'-no-sau-nee (People of the Long-House), was from fifty to eighty and sometimes one hundred feet long. It consisted of a strong frame of upright poles set in the ground, which were strengthened with horizontal poles attached with withes, and surmounted with a triangular, and in some cases with a round roof. It was covered over, both sides and roof, with large strips of elm bark tied to the frame with strings or splints. An external frame of poles for the side...

Historic Accounts of Iroquois Indian Villages and Long Houses



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